If your child has been diagnosed with a hearing loss, you can contact Tara Foundation and our team of qualified audiologists, listening and spoken language therapists and child family counsellors can support you and your family. To delay treatment of hearing loss is to delay and impair the development of a child’s listening, language and social skills – impaired development occurs with all degrees of hearing loss, regardless of whether the loss is in one ear or both ears. If you suspect your child may have a hearing loss, visit your local GP

If your child is diagnosed with hearing loss, Tara Foundation can help. Please call us today on (079) 26575585 .

Degrees of hearing loss

The degree of hearing loss is measured in terms of how it impacts on everyday life.

Mild: 21–45 dB It might be difficult to hear speech and conversations that are soft, but you are able to hear voices clearly in quiet situations. A hearing device will assist most problems with mild hearing loss.

Moderate: 46–65 dB Conversational speech is hard to hear, particularly when it takes place in background noise, and especially when background noise is high, for example when the television or radio are turned up. If background noise is low and speech discrimination is good, a hearing device will assist most difficulties with moderate hearing loss.

Severe: 66–90 dB Normal conversational speech is inaudible, but can be detected with a hearing device. The clarity of speech heard is likely to be significantly altered and visual cues will help in understanding speech and conversations.

Profound: 91 dB + The benefit derived from a hearing device varies greatly. Some may be able to understand speech if they are face to face with whom they are talking to, conversing in good auditory conditions, and wearing a hearing device. But others will find it impossible.

A variety of biological and physical processes can cause hearing loss, which can be either congenital (you’re born with it) or acquired (you get it later in life). There are four main categories: • Conductive • Sensorineural • Mixed • Retrocochlear

If your child has hearing loss, Tara Foundation can help. Please call us today on (079) 26575585 .


Conductive

Conductive hearing loss stems from problems in the outer or middle ear. It can be caused by earwax, an ear infection, a punctured eardrum, a build-up of fluid or abnormal bone growth.

Sensorineural

Sensorineural hearing loss occurs when the part of the ear that changes sound into electrical information (the cochlea) and the part of the ear that sends that electrical information to the brain (the auditory nerve) is damaged. This type of hearing loss is usually permanent. It can relate to genetic factors or be caused by ageing, diseases or exposure to noise and chemicals.

Mixed

Mixed hearing loss is due to a combination of the conductive and sensorineural varieties. For example, someone may have sensorineural hearing loss caused by ageing or a genetic condition, and conductive loss from a middle-ear infection at the same time.

Retrocochlear

Retrocochlear hearing loss occurs when the auditory nerve (1) itself is affected. Although sound is processed properly by the inner ear (2), the auditory nerve has difficulty transmitting it to the brain. People affected tend to have trouble listening in the presence of background noise.

Our ability to hear and interpret sound comes from our brain and not our ears. Children with hearing loss face greater challenges developing their listening, language and social skills because they experience greater difficulty hearing and interpreting sound.


If your child has been diagnosed with hearing loss, it must be addressed immediately, regardless of whether the loss is in one ear or both ears, or if it varies or remains the same. Unlike adults, any delay in treating a child’s hearing loss can impair their listening, language and social development because they are still learning how to make sense of what they hear.


At Tara Foundation our team of qualified audiologists, listening and spoken language therapists and child family counsellors can work together with you and your family to provide you with the best possible outcomes. If you suspect your child may have a hearing loss, you can contact us to organise a hearing test or call on (079) 26575585 to arrange a check-up. Below we have put together a brief list of common hearing loss conditions:


Symmetrical hearing loss means the degree of hearing loss is the same in both ears.


Asymmetrical hearing loss means the degree of hearing loss is different in both ears.


Bilateral hearing loss means hearing loss occurs in both ears. It can be in the outer ear, middle ear or inner ear and may be symmetrical or asymmetrical.


Unilateral hearing loss means hearing loss occurs in one ear only and can be in the outer, middle or inner ear.


Auditory Processing Disorders (APD) – also known as Central Auditory Processing Disorders (CAPD) – covers a range of hearing disorders that arise when the brain is unable to understand information within a sound because its hearing and listening processing abilities are impaired. APD doesn’t just affect the ability to hear sound, it also makes it difficult to understand speech and identify the direction certain sounds come from.


Spatial Processing Disorder (SPD) is a common type of APD. It happens when the brain’s auditory processing can’t decide what direction one sound is coming from or contain sounds coming from other directions. This means the listener is unable to perceive or pinpoint certain sounds in their immediate environment. Children with APD have trouble understanding conversations when there is background noise, experience difficulty in locating specific sounds and find learning in a classroom challenging. Unlike other hearing problems, APD happens on an irregular basis, so children may have no trouble processing different sounds one day but another day strain to comprehend the sounds around them. If left untreated, APD can hinder a child’s learning abilities.